Welding

Welding stainless steel

Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, mostly metals, by using high heat to melt the parts together and allowing them to cool, causing fusion. It is a widely used technique in the fabrication of equipment such as tubes or heat exchangers.

Latest welding news

Below you can find the latest newsitems that involve the topic of welding.

If you wish to include your news release on our website and email newsletter, please feel free to contact the editor.

Weld seam tracking system

Meta Vision Systems has introduced the Laser Probe 2000, an automatic weld seam tracking tool.

Model 8-2000 Narrow Weld Head

Arc Machines’ introduces the Model 8-2000 weld head, an orbital weld head used for fusion TIG (GTAW) welding of fittings, tubing and thin wall pipe.

New Sandvik products at Schweissen Schneiden

New products will feature alongside a wide range of filler wire and rods, covered and strip electrodes and fluxes for welding stainless and high alloy steels on Sandvik’s Steel stand at Schweissen Schneiden.

Lincoln Electric introduces pulsed mig-welding

The Lincoln Electric Company introduces its news Invertec V350-PRO an advanced process model equipped with pulse MIG welding capability.

Lincoln offers new robotic welding cell

Lincoln has introduced its latest pre-engineered robotic welding cell, the System 50.

New power source from Orbital Welding

Portability and mobility mark the new PS 164 orbital tube and pipe welding power source, an addition to the Astro Arc Polysoude PS Series, which includes four power sources in a variety of current ranges.

Lincoln’s pulsed MIG Welding available factory-ins

The Lincoln Electric Company has introduced its newest Invertec™ V350-PRO, an advanced process model equipped with pulse MIG welding capability.

Lincoln adds three new SP MIG welders

The Lincoln Electric Company has added three new models to its line of SP compact MIG wire feeder/welders, these are the SP-135 T, SP-175 T and SP-135 Plus.

Orbital Welding Symposium

Organised in the past by Polysoude, Orbital Welding Symposium this year is being organised and co-sponsored by Polysoude and the Tube & Pipe Association (TPA).

New welding equipment from Air Liquide

At Schweissen und Schneiden (Essen, 12–18 September 2001) Air Liquide Welding will exhibit to industries using welding and cutting techniques.


Stainless steel is a popular material in various industries due to its corrosion resistance, durability, and aesthetic appeal. Here are some key points to consider when welding stainless steel:

Choose the appropriate welding process: There are several welding processes suitable for stainless steel, including Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding, Metal Inert Gas (MIG) welding, and Stick welding (Shielded Metal Arc Welding). TIG welding is often preferred for stainless steel due to its precision and ability to produce high-quality welds.

Prepare the materials: Before welding, it’s important to clean the stainless steel surfaces to remove any contaminants, such as oil, grease, or dirt. Use a stainless steel wire brush or a dedicated solvent to clean the area.

Select the appropriate filler material: When welding stainless steel, it’s generally recommended to use a filler metal that matches or is compatible with the base metal. Commonly used filler materials for stainless steel welding include austenitic stainless steel filler rods or wires, such as ER308, ER309, or ER316.

Set the welding parameters: The welding parameters, such as current, voltage, travel speed, and shielding gas flow rate, will depend on the thickness of the stainless steel and the specific welding process being used.

Ensure proper shielding gas: Stainless steel welding typically requires the use of an inert gas, such as argon or a mixture of argon and helium, to create a protective atmosphere around the weld and prevent oxidation. The shielding gas should be supplied continuously and cover the weld pool adequately.

Maintain good joint fit-up and control heat input: Stainless steel has a relatively low thermal conductivity compared to other metals, so it’s essential to control the heat input during welding. Proper joint fit-up, including gap and root opening, helps control distortion and ensures proper fusion.

Post-weld treatment: Stainless steel welds may require post-weld treatment to restore corrosion resistance. This can involve processes such as passivation or pickling, which remove any oxides or contaminants from the welded area. The specific post-weld treatment will depend on the application and the stainless steel grade used.

It’s important to note that welding stainless steel can be complex, and there may be additional considerations depending on the specific application, grade of stainless steel, and welding codes and standards. If you’re not experienced in welding stainless steel, it’s advisable to consult with a professional welder or seek training to ensure proper techniques and safety precautions are followed.